Guidance: High Consequence Infectious Diseases (HCID) - GOV.UK


Covid-19 was downgraded from the HCID status on Mar 19, 2020 and removed from the HCID list (you can see that it is not included in the list, at the end of this post).


THIS IS WHAT THEY'RE HIDING FROM YOU IN PLAIN SIGHT.

CULPABLE DENIABILITY FOR THE GOVT, WHEN PEOPLE RISE UP IN ARMS IN THE FUTURE.

WE HAD THIS ON OUR OFFICIAL WEBSITE, YOU WERE NOT SMART ENOUGH TO USE YOUR COMMON SENSE AND JUDGEMENT.

THIS IS HOW THE DEEP STATE/SHADOW GOVT/THE CABAL OPERATE. THEY LEAVE YOU BREAD CRUMBS TO FIND.

JUST LIKE THE EVENT 201 WEBSITE: https://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/event201/

DO YOU HAVE TO BE TOLD WHERE TO LOOK, WHAT TO THINK, WHAT TO BELIEVE, BY THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA?

PLEASE WAKE UP! FOR THE SAKE OF YOUR CHILDREN AND FUTURE GENERATIONS.


Thanks to Charlie Ward for consistently reminding his viewers about the downgrading of the Covid-19 virus threat and for sharing the link to this page on the UK Govt website.


Note: The information below is from the UK Govt website as it appears today (Sep 2, 2020).


CONTENT SOURCE/OWNER




Guidance
High consequence infectious diseases (HCID)

Guidance and information about high consequence infectious diseases and their management in England.

Published 22 October 2018
Last updated 17 June 2020 — see all updates


Status of COVID-19

As of 19 March 2020, COVID-19 is no longer considered to be a high consequence infectious disease (HCID) in the UK.

The 4 nations public health HCID group made an interim recommendation in January 2020 to classify COVID-19 as an HCID. This was based on consideration of the UK HCID criteria about the virus and the disease with information available during the early stages of the outbreak. Now that more is known about COVID-19, the public health bodies in the UK have reviewed the most up to date information about COVID-19 against the UK HCID criteria. They have determined that several features have now changed; in particular, more information is available about mortality rates (low overall), and there is now greater clinical awareness and a specific and sensitive laboratory test, the availability of which continues to increase.

The Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) is also of the opinion that COVID-19 should no longer be classified as an HCID.

The need to have a national, coordinated response remains, but this is being met by the government’s COVID-19 response.

Cases of COVID-19 are no longer managed by HCID treatment centres only. All healthcare workers managing possible and confirmed cases should follow the updated national infection and prevention (IPC) guidance for COVID-19, which supersedes all previous IPC guidance for COVID-19. This guidance includes instructions about different personal protective equipment (PPE) ensembles that are appropriate for different clinical scenarios.


Definition of HCID

In the UK, a high consequence infectious disease (HCID) is defined according to the following criteria:

  • acute infectious disease
  • typically has a high case-fatality rate
  • may not have effective prophylaxis or treatment
  • often difficult to recognise and detect rapidly
  • ability to spread in the community and within healthcare settings
  • requires an enhanced individual, population and system response to ensure it is managed effectively, efficiently and safely


Classification of HCIDs

HCIDs are further divided into contact and airborne groups:

  • contact HCIDs are usually spread by direct contact with an infected patient or infected fluids, tissues and other materials, or by indirect contact with contaminated materials and fomites
  • airborne HCIDs are spread by respiratory droplets or aerosol transmission, in addition to contact routes of transmission


List of high consequence infectious diseases

A list of HCIDs has been agreed by a joint Public Health England (PHE) and NHS England HCID Programme:

Contact HCID                                                    Airborne HCID

Argentine haemorrhagic fever (Junin virus)      Andes virus infection (hantavirus)

Bolivian haemorrhagic fever (Machupo virus)     Avian influenza A H7N9 and H5N1

Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF)       Avian influenza A H5N6 and H7N7

Ebola virus disease (EVD)                               Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)

Lassa fever                                                       Monkeypox

Lujo virus disease                                               Nipah virus infection

Marburg virus disease (MVD)                       Pneumonic plague (Yersinia pestis)

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia                    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)*
syndrome (SFTS)


*No cases reported since 2004, but SARS remains a notifiable disease under the International Health Regulations (2005), hence its inclusion here

**Human to human transmission has not been described to date for avian influenza A(H5N6). Human to human transmission has been described for avian influenza A(H5N1), although this was not apparent until more than 30 human cases had been reported. Both A(H5N6) and A(H5N1) often cause severe illness and fatalities. Therefore, A(H5N6) has been included in the airborne HCID list despite not meeting all of the HCID criteria.

The list of HCIDs will be kept under review and updated by PHE if new HCIDs emerge that are of relevance to the UK.


----------------

Comments